Chapati (Atta) Flour

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Pillsbury Chapati Chakki Atta (whole wheat flour)

10.9919.95 Including BTW
10.9919.95 Including BTW Select options
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Out of stock

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Aashirvaad Atta (whole wheat flour)

9.9519.50 Including BTW
9.9519.50 Including BTW Select options
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TRS Gram Flour

TRS
2.754.95 Including BTW
2.754.95 Including BTW Select options
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4 in stock

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Mogul Chapatti (Atta) Flour

12.5018.99 Including BTW
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Out of stock

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TRS Gari, Cassavameel

TRS
1.75 Including BTW Read more
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Tapioca Starch

1.75 Including BTW Add to cart

5 in stock

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Beray Wheat Flour (Maida flour)

1.75 Including BTW
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Rice Flour

1.75 Including BTW Add to cart
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Out of stock

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AFP Gari Wit

AFP
2.95 Including BTW Add to cart
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TRS Ground Rice

TRS
1.50 Including BTW Add to cart

1 in stock

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Super Punjab Chakki Atta

27.99 Including BTW Add to cart
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Roasted Rava (sooji)

3.50 Including BTW Add to cart
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Self-Raising Flour, Zelfrijzend Bakmeel

1.997.50 Including BTW
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What is Chapati (atta) flour? And how is Chapati flour made?

Chapati flour or Atta is a type of whole wheat flour from India, it is the main ingredient for many delicious dishes in South Asian cuisine. Chapati (atta) flour is made from durum wheat. Therefore, Atta Flour contains a large number of vitamins and proteins. A dough made with atta flour is usually stiff; however, it is possible to flatten it into very thin roti.

What is the difference between Chapati (atta) flour and wheat flour?

The main difference between Chapati (atta) flour and wheat flour is that Chapati flour is processed by grinding the whole grain of wheat, whereas ordinary wheat flour is often obtained by grinding the grain of wheat after removing the bran and germ. This process has made whole wheat chapati flour have a grainy texture combined with all the nutrients, making it relatively healthier than ordinary wheat flour, which has a lower concentration of fibre and is devoid of some essential proteins.

How to make perfect chapati?

It’s easy to make a perfect Chapati. First, mix Chapati (atta) flour, the oil and salt (optional) in a large bowl. Then slowly add water, and begin to knead into a firm, elastic dough.

Let the dough rest for at least 10 – 15 minutes, if you don’t have time, you can keep the dough in the refrigerator for 2 – 3 days.

Divide the dough into small balls, then dust the dough ball with dry flour. Roll these balls as thin as possible into pancakes with a rolling pin.

Prepare a medium-high heat skillet, then fry the chapati slice for about 30 seconds to a minute per side. After 2-3 minutes when the slice becomes a little brown, press the outside of the slice, and you will see that the chapati starts to puff.

Bake the Chapati a little more when you see brown spots and edges appear, and then the chapati is ready. If you want to make the chapati tastier, and softer, spread the chapati with ghee (a type of Indian butter). Furthermore, chapati can be eaten along with chutney or biryani chicken.

Watch the illustrative video here